Proportions – Low Dimension http://lowdimension.net/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 11:28:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lowdimension.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Proportions – Low Dimension http://lowdimension.net/ 32 32 Auralée Spring 2023 https://lowdimension.net/auralee-spring-2023/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 11:28:50 +0000 https://lowdimension.net/auralee-spring-2023/ Japanese brand Auralee has returned to Paris after more than two years away with a collection exploring lightweight layers of materials not usually associated with the warmer months such as wool, mohair and cashmere. For spring, the main idea was to offer a versatile wardrobe that was stylish enough for urban occasions while being simple […]]]>

Japanese brand Auralee has returned to Paris after more than two years away with a collection exploring lightweight layers of materials not usually associated with the warmer months such as wool, mohair and cashmere.

For spring, the main idea was to offer a versatile wardrobe that was stylish enough for urban occasions while being simple enough to adapt to a variety of weather conditions, designer Ryota Iwai explained by the through a translator. Given the changeable weather in Paris, her lightweight layers of natural fibers were a desirable proposition.

No more WWD

Lightly structured jackets were cut from tropical wools, sheer mohair knits were strategically layered, tube tops were paired with pleated skirts or layered over shirts. Cropped proportions grounded the lineup in current tropes, while bright green, purple, or orange tones gave depth to Iwai’s layering.

Climbing-inspired backpacks and sneakers, a new chapter in the brand’s ongoing collaboration with New Balance, reinforced the feeling of being ready to go anytime.

If the sophistication of Iwai’s textile developments can be translated through a screen, seeing them – and touching them – turned these juxtapositions of airy layers into a solid proposition.

Launch the gallery: Auralée Spring 2023

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COVID-19 vaccines saved 20 million deaths worldwide in first year https://lowdimension.net/covid-19-vaccines-saved-20-million-deaths-worldwide-in-first-year/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 19:24:39 +0000 https://lowdimension.net/covid-19-vaccines-saved-20-million-deaths-worldwide-in-first-year/ According to a new modeling study, published in The Lancet Infectious DiseasesCOVID-19 vaccines are estimated to have averted 20 million deaths worldwide in the first year of the vaccination program. First modeling study to quantify the impact of[{” attribute=””>COVID-19 vaccines on a global scale estimates that 19.8 million out of a potential 31.4 million deaths […]]]>

According to a new modeling study, published in The Lancet Infectious DiseasesCOVID-19 vaccines are estimated to have averted 20 million deaths worldwide in the first year of the vaccination program.

  • First modeling study to quantify the impact of[{” attribute=””>COVID-19 vaccines on a global scale estimates that 19.8 million out of a potential 31.4 million deaths were prevented in the first year after vaccines were introduced (December 8, 2020 – December 8, 2021).
  • A further 599,300 deaths could have been averted if the World Health Organisation’s target of vaccinating 40% of the population in every country by the end of 2021 had been met.
  • High- and upper-middle-income countries accounted for the greatest number of prevented deaths (12.2 million/ 19.8 million), highlighting inequalities in access to vaccines around the world.
  • The study is based on data from 185 countries and territories and is the first to assess deaths averted directly and indirectly as a result of COVID-19 vaccination, using COVID-19 death records and total excess deaths from each country (or estimates where official data was not available). 

COVID-19 vaccines reduced the potential global death toll during the pandemic by more than half in the year following their implementation, according to estimates from a mathematical modeling study published on June 23, 2022, in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

19.8 million out of a potential 31.4 million COVID-19 deaths were prevented worldwide in the first year of the vaccination program according to estimates based on excess deaths from 185 countries and territories.

The researchers estimate that a further 599,300 lives could have been saved if the World Health Organisation’s target of vaccinating 40% of the population in each country with two or more doses by the end of 2021 had been met.

Dr. Oliver Watson, lead author of the study, from Imperial College London, said: “Our findings offer the most complete assessment to date of the remarkable global impact that vaccination has had on the COVID-19 pandemic. Of the almost 20 million deaths estimated to have been prevented in the first year after vaccines were introduced, almost 7.5 million deaths were prevented in countries covered by the COVID-19 Vaccine Access initiative (COVAX). This initiative was set up because it was clear early on that global vaccine equity would be the only way out of the pandemic. Our findings show that millions of lives have likely been saved by making vaccines available to people everywhere, regardless of their wealth. However, more could have been done. If the targets set out by the WHO had been achieved, we estimate that roughly 1 in 5 of the estimated lives lost due to COVID-19 in low-income countries could have been prevented. ”

Since the first COVID-19 vaccine was administered outside of a clinical trial setting on December 8, 2020, almost two-thirds of the world’s population has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine (66%). The COVID-19 Vaccine Access initiative (COVAX) has facilitated access to affordable vaccines for lower-income countries to try to reduce inequalities, with an initial target of giving two vaccine doses to 20% of the population in countries covered by the commitment by the end of 2021. The World Health Organisation expanded this target by setting a global strategy to fully vaccinate 70% of the world’s population by mid-2022, with an interim target of vaccinating 40% of the population of all countries by the end of 2021.

Despite the incredible speed of the vaccine roll-out worldwide, more than 3.5 million COVID-19 deaths have been reported since the first vaccine was administered in December 2020.

Several studies have sought to estimate the impact of vaccination on the course of the pandemic. These studies have focused on specific regions, such as individual countries, states, or cities. The latest study is the first to estimate the impact of COVID-19 vaccinations on a global scale and the first to assess the number of deaths averted both directly and indirectly.

Mr. Gregory Barnsley, co-first author of the study, from Imperial College London, said: “Quantifying the impact that vaccination has made globally is challenging because access to vaccines varies between countries, as does our understanding of which COVID-19 variants have been circulating, with very limited genetic sequence data available for many countries. It is also not possible to directly measure how many deaths would have occurred without vaccinations. Mathematical modeling offers a useful tool for assessing alternative scenarios, which we can’t directly observe in real life.”

To estimate the impact of global vaccination programs, the researchers used an established model of COVID-19 transmission using country-level data for officially recorded COVID-19 deaths occurring between 8 December 2020 and 8 December 2021. To account for the under-reporting of deaths in countries with weaker surveillance systems, they carried out a separate analysis based on the number of excess deaths recorded above those that would have been expected during the same time period. Where official data was not available, the team used estimates of all-cause excess mortality. These analyses were compared with an alternative hypothetical scenario in which no vaccines were delivered.

The model accounted for variation in vaccination rates between countries, as well as differences in vaccine efficacy in each country based on the vaccine types known to have been predominately used in those areas. Notably, China was not included in the analysis owing to its large population and very strict lockdown measures, which would have skewed the findings.

The team found that, based on officially recorded COVID-19 deaths, an estimated 18.1 million deaths would have occurred during the study period if vaccinations had not been implemented. Of these, the model estimates that vaccination has prevented 14.4 million deaths, representing a global reduction of 79%. These findings do not account for the under-reporting of COVID-19 deaths, which is common in lower-income countries. The team did a further analysis based on total excess deaths during the same time period to account for this. They found that COVID-19 vaccination prevented an estimated 19.8 million deaths out of a total of 31.4 million potential deaths that would have occurred without vaccination, a reduction of 63%.

More than three quarters (79%, 15.5 million/ 19.8 million) of deaths averted were due to the direct protection against severe symptoms provided by vaccination, leading to lower mortality rates. The remaining 4.3 million averted deaths were estimated to have been prevented by indirect protection from reduced transmission of the virus in the population and reduced burden on healthcare systems, thereby improving access to medical care for those most in need.

Vaccine impact changed over time and in different areas of the world as the pandemic progressed, the study found. In the first half of 2021, the greatest number of deaths averted by vaccination was seen in lower middle-income countries, resulting from the significant epidemic wave in India as the Delta variant emerged. This subsequently shifted to the greatest impact being concentrated in higher income countries in the second half of 2021, as restrictions on travel and social mixing were eased in some areas leading to greater virus transmission.

Overall, the number of estimated deaths prevented per person was greatest in high-income countries, reflecting the earlier and wider rollout of vaccination campaigns in these areas (66 deaths prevented per 10,000 people in high-income countries vs 2.711 deaths prevented per 10,000 people in low-income countries). High- and upper-middle-income countries accounted for the greatest number of deaths averted (12.2 million/ 19.8 million), highlighting inequalities in access to vaccines around the world.

For the 83 countries included in the analysis that are covered by the COVAX commitment to affordable vaccines, an estimated 7.4 million deaths were averted out of a potential 17.9 million (41%). However, failure to meet the COVAX target of fully vaccinating 20% of the population in some countries is estimated to have resulted in an additional 156,900 deaths. Though this figure represents a small proportion of the total global deaths, these preventable deaths were concentrated in 31 African nations, where 132,700 deaths could have been averted if the target had been met.

Similarly, the shortfall in the WHO target of fully vaccinating 40% of the population of each country by the end of 2021 is estimated to have contributed to an additional 599,300 deaths worldwide that could have been prevented. Lower-middle income countries accounted for the majority of these deaths (347,500/599,300 [59.7%]). Regionally, most of these deaths were concentrated in the African and Eastern Mediterranean regions (348,900/599,300 [58.2%] and 126,800/599,300 [21.2%] respectively). If the 40% target had been reached in all low-income countries, the number of deaths averted by vaccination in these areas would have more than doubled (200,000 additional deaths averted in addition to the 180,300 deaths estimated to have been averted with current vaccination rates).

Professor Azra Ghani, Chair of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at Imperial College London: “Our study demonstrates the enormous benefit that vaccines have had in reducing deaths from COVID-19 around the world. As the intense focus on the pandemic has now shifted, it is important that we ensure that the most vulnerable people in all parts of the world are protected from the continued circulation of COVID-19 and other diseases. that continue to disproportionately affect the poorest. Ensuring equitable access to vaccines is crucial, but requires more than just donating vaccines. Improvements in vaccine distribution and infrastructure, as well as coordinated efforts to counter vaccine misinformation and improve demand for vaccines, are needed. Only then can we ensure that everyone has the opportunity to benefit from these life-saving technologies. »

The authors note several limitations to their findings. Notably, their model is based on a number of necessary assumptions, including the precise proportions of vaccine types that were delivered, how they were delivered, and the precise timing of the arrival of new virus variants in each. country. They also assumed that the relationship between age and the proportion of COVID-19 deaths occurring among infected people is the same for each country. More generally, the results of the study should be seen in the context of uncertainty in calculating the true death toll from the pandemic due to the difference in country-level reporting of COVID-19 mortality.

Writing in a linked comment, Professor Alison Galvani, who was not involved in the study, from Yale University School of Public Health, USA, said: “Saving more than 19 million lives through the unprecedented speed of development and deployment of COVID-19 vaccines is an extraordinary global health feat. Nevertheless, millions more lives could be saved by more equitable distribution of vaccines. »

She added: “High coverage in an individual country not only benefits that country, but contributes to the global reduction in transmission and the emergence of new variants. A sustainable collective response is both pragmatic and ethically imperative.

Reference: “Global Impact of the First Year of COVID-19 Vaccination: A Mathematical Modeling Study” by Oliver J Watson, PhD; Gregory Barnsley, MSc; Jaspreet Toor, PhD; Alexandra B Hogan, PhD; Peter Winskill, PhD and Prof Azra C Ghani, PhD, June 23, 2022, The Lancet Infectious Diseases.
DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(22)00320-6

The study was carried out by researchers from the Medical Research Council Center for Global Infectious Disease Analysis at Imperial College London, UK. It was funded by a Schmidt Science Fellowship in partnership with the Rhodes Trust, World Health Organization, UK Medical Research Council, Gavi, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, National Institute of Health Research and Community Jameel .

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An economic crisis https://lowdimension.net/an-economic-crisis/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://lowdimension.net/an-economic-crisis/ Pakistan is undoubtedly facing an economic crisis of gigantic proportions caused by the gross mismanagement of the economy by successive elected and military governments over the past decades. These governments have taken the easy way out while managing the economic crisis, which has only worsened over time. Necessary but difficult corrective decisions have been avoided […]]]>

Pakistan is undoubtedly facing an economic crisis of gigantic proportions caused by the gross mismanagement of the economy by successive elected and military governments over the past decades.

These governments have taken the easy way out while managing the economic crisis, which has only worsened over time. Necessary but difficult corrective decisions have been avoided or postponed at enormous cost to the nation as a whole. This politically easy approach has made the task of each successive government more difficult than it otherwise would have been, as the scale and severity of the country’s economic problems have steadily grown. As a result, the country is now virtually on the brink of economic disaster unless decisive action is taken to stem the rot.

The most serious problem facing our economic policymakers is the tendency of the Pakistani economy to run unsustainable current account deficits whenever the government attempts to accelerate the rate of GDP growth. For example, in 2017-2018, when GDP growth was estimated at 6.1%, the current account deficit reached the high level of $19.1 billion. In subsequent years, the PTI government slowed the rate of GDP growth, which led to lower current account deficits. However, as he attempted to accelerate the rate of GDP growth, the high current account deficit reappeared. The 2021-22 fiscal year with a GDP growth rate of 6% is expected to end with a current account deficit of $17 billion.

The immediate cause of the increase in the current account deficit in fiscal year 2022 is the sharp increase in imports compared to relatively slow growth in exports. The import bill jumped to $72.18 billion between July 2021 and May 2022. At this rate, the total import bill for 2021-22 would be around $78 billion from $54.27 billion a year earlier. On the other hand, exports, estimated at 28.84 billion dollars over the period from July 2021 to May 2022, will increase to 31 billion dollars at the end of June 2022. The situation calls for drastic fiscal, monetary and administrative measures to reduce the sharp reduction in imports while encouraging exports and import substitution in order to be able to balance our external account.

In the final analysis, however, the current account deficit reflects the excess of national investment over national saving. This is why whenever the government tries to accelerate the GDP growth rate by increasing the national investment rate without increasing the national saving rate, it inevitably leads to high current account deficits. It happened in 2017-18 and is happening again in 2021-22. The moral is that if we are to achieve high GDP growth rates in the years to come without running into unsustainable current account deficits, we must raise our national savings rate to at least 20% of GDP or even more relative to the current low level of 11.1% of GDP. Austerity coupled with effective policies to promote exports and substitute imports is therefore a prerequisite for sustainably accelerating Pakistan’s GDP growth rate.

High public deficits are another source of weakness and vulnerability in our economy. The proposed federal budget for 2022-23 pegs total expenditure at 9.50 trillion rupees against the estimated net federal revenue of 4.9 trillion rupees. The budget deficit is therefore expected to be around 4.6 trillion rupees. The stark reality is that debt service (3.95 trillion rupees) and defense (1.52 trillion rupees) alone will exceed net federal revenue by 570 billion rupees.

The budget deficit as a percentage of GDP is expected to decline from 6.3% in 2021-22 to 4.9% in 2022-23. Despite everything, its high level in absolute terms will keep the federal government’s budgetary position tight in addition to generating inflationary pressures. Given the high level of the budget deficit, the rising prices of gasoline, diesel and other petroleum products and international inflationary trends, it is unlikely that the government will be able to contain inflation in the 11.5% limit set for 2022. -23.

The tight fiscal position of the federal government calls for a reform of the tax system to raise the tax-to-GDP ratio from 9.2%, as projected in the draft federal budget for 2022-23, to more than 20%. Until the federal government is able to implement these reforms and tightly control its current spending, its fiscal deficits and public debt will continue to grow rapidly. Already, total public debt, which was estimated at 24.953 trillion rupees at the end of June 2018, has risen to 44.366 trillion rupees at the end of March 2022 – hardly a story of fiscal prudence.

The 2022-2023 budget sets the objective of a GDP growth rate of 5%. It envisages a federal development expenditure of 727 billion rupees against actual development expenditure of 550 billion rupees for the year 2021-22. In addition, the provinces will incur development expenditure amounting to Rs 1.4 trillion, bringing the total development expenditure to Rs 2.1 trillion in 2022-2023.

Overall, the draft budget aims to stabilize the economy by maintaining a reasonably high GDP growth rate, easing inflationary pressures, and reducing current account and fiscal deficits. However, the 2022-2023 budget does not go far enough to raise the tax-to-GDP ratio and the national savings rate to the high levels required to place the country on a path of sustainably high growth rates. It also remains to be seen whether and to what extent the government is taking steps to reduce imports and promote exports and import substitution with the aim of reducing the current account deficit.

Historically, education, which is a prerequisite for economic development, has received low priority from Pakistani governments in terms of resource allocation. Our national expenditure on education has generally remained below 2% of GDP, against the standard of 4% of GDP recommended by Unesco. Ideally, our national expenditure on education should be above 4% of GDP on the model of rapidly developing economies, if we are to transform Pakistan into a dynamic and progressive country with a worthy place in the community of nations. Unfortunately, the budget for 2022-2023 does not reflect the high priority this critically important sector deserves.

The writer is a retired ambassador. He can be contacted at: javid.husain@gmail.com

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Captured US veterans face death penalty https://lowdimension.net/captured-us-veterans-face-death-penalty/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 07:00:28 +0000 https://lowdimension.net/captured-us-veterans-face-death-penalty/ Two American veterans who were captured by Russian-backed separatist forces in a battle near Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second-largest city, could face the death penalty earlier this month, Russian spokesman Dmitry Peskov said told NBC News. Peskov declared the fate of Andy Tai Ngoc Huynh, 27, and Army Sgt. Alexander Drueke, 39, will be tried in a […]]]>
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Spain battles wildfires fueled by one of the first heat waves on record | Spain https://lowdimension.net/spain-battles-wildfires-fueled-by-one-of-the-first-heat-waves-on-record-spain/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 16:48:00 +0000 https://lowdimension.net/spain-battles-wildfires-fueled-by-one-of-the-first-heat-waves-on-record-spain/ Flames licked the roads and colored the skies orange as firefighters across northern Spain raced to contain dozens of blazes fueled by one of the first heat waves on record. In the Sierra de la Culebra mountain range in the northwestern province of Zamora, flames have devoured more than 25,000 hectares, forcing the evacuation of […]]]>

Flames licked the roads and colored the skies orange as firefighters across northern Spain raced to contain dozens of blazes fueled by one of the first heat waves on record.

In the Sierra de la Culebra mountain range in the northwestern province of Zamora, flames have devoured more than 25,000 hectares, forcing the evacuation of hundreds of residents from 18 municipalities.

Emergency service officials said on Sunday that cooling temperatures had allowed them to make progress in stabilizing the blaze, which a fire association had described earlier like a “real monster”.

More than 600 firefighters had battled to temper the blaze, which tore through a mountain range that ranks as one of Spain’s green jewels, a densely forested strip of land whose pines are home to more than 70 species of trees. birds and one of the highest concentrations of Iberians in Europe. wolves.

“It’s really worrying,” said environmentalist Sergi García. “It is a unique area, which is home to one of the richest biodiversity in Europe. And he was hit by a devastating fire of brutal proportions.

The area has become known in recent years for being home to one of the largest wolf populations in Western Europe, with its forested hills playing a key role in helping the Iberian population rebound from a few hundred animals in the 1970s to more of 2,500 across Spain today.

It was still too early to assess how the fire had affected the wolves, but García said the timing of the fire – just about two months after most cubs were born – suggested the consequences could be severe.

“The fire affected an area that serves as a breeding nucleus for this species,” he said. “If it had happened in the summer, maybe the puppies could have run away. But right now they are very young.

Days of scorching heat across Spain have been blamed for fueling dozens of wildfires in eight of the country’s 17 regions. Catalan officials said on Saturday that firefighters were struggling to put out more than 30 fires.

In the Navarre region, authorities evacuated about 15 municipalities as concerns grew that efforts to fight several fires could be foiled by high temperatures and winds. “We have a few very difficult hours ahead of us,” Navarra Interior Ministry director Amparo López Antelo told reporters.

Extreme weather conditions spread to parts of France, which recorded its first heat wave in 75 years. Temperatures in the resort town of Biarritz hit a record high of 42.9 degrees Celsius. Around 2,500 sheep had to be evacuated after a fire caused by an artillery shell fired during military training burned around 200 hectares in southern France.

Fires have also broken out in Germany, where residents of three villages near Berlin have been ordered to leave their homes due to an impending blaze on Sunday. In Italy, a record drought led several towns to announce water rationing and the region of Lombardy was considering whether to declare a state of emergency.

The extreme weather came as Spain’s national meteorological agency said climate change was leading to earlier summers and more frequent heat waves.

“In the middle of the 21st century, which is not too far away, a normal summer could be as hot as the hottest summer we have experienced so far, or even hotter,” Aemet spokesman Rubén said recently. del Campo. “So what’s extraordinary now will eventually become normal.”

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What are Ohio economic analysts watching for inflation growth? https://lowdimension.net/what-are-ohio-economic-analysts-watching-for-inflation-growth/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 17:41:00 +0000 https://lowdimension.net/what-are-ohio-economic-analysts-watching-for-inflation-growth/ Ohio analysts are watching closely some federal decisions to address the inflation problem, fearing an overreaction could cause more economic problems. The May Consumer Price Index report showed that inflation in the United States increased by 8.6% over the past 12 months, the largest annual increase since December 1981. Rea Hederman, Vice President of Policy […]]]>

Ohio analysts are watching closely some federal decisions to address the inflation problem, fearing an overreaction could cause more economic problems.

The May Consumer Price Index report showed that inflation in the United States increased by 8.6% over the past 12 months, the largest annual increase since December 1981.

Rea Hederman, Vice President of Policy at the Buckeye Institute, and Guillermo Bervejillo, Ohio State Policy Officer, Policy Matters, both agree that a major factor in the inflation crisis in the United States is the lack of supply.

But the two disagree on the role federal bailouts have played in boosting demand. Hederman noted that two stimulus packages — from two White House administrations — have reached historic proportions.

“Many households actually saw their incomes increase during the pandemic because the United States had one of the biggest bailouts of any country. This is one of the reasons why core inflation in the United States has exceeded inflation in Europe,” Hederman said.

Bervejillo said the country only felt the brunt of inflation long after the effects of those stimulus dollars wore off. He mentioned a study of Economic Policy Institute which tracked inflation from 2020 to 2021. This study indicated that 54% of price increases were attributable to corporate profits.

“The ballpark impact between the generosity of the stimulus bills and the current situation is how it was picked up by the financial sector and not how much it hit our wallets,” Bervejillo said.

The two said decisions made over the next few months could have a big impact on the future of the economy in the United States and Ohio.

“Is inflation shifting more from goods to services, affecting wages? They could cause the Fed to keep raising rates faster, which will drive down consumer spending and really start to threaten the overall health of the economy,” Hederman said.

The Federal Reserve Board took action on Wednesday to raise interest rates by 0.75%, the biggest increase since 1994.

Hederman and Bervejillo said it was important for the Federal Reserve to strike a delicate balance.

“We’re talking about a huge impact on people, on people’s ability to have money to pay for the things we need. I think I’m not optimistic in part because there’s a predominance of this idea that the only response we have is this kind of heavy, blunt instrument-fed response,” Bervejillo said.

The two analysts also said soaring gas prices are also causing economic ripples that are affecting the supply and shipping of that supply.

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Sheriff’s Office Audit Reveals Racial Disparities; Parking officers want access to the crime database; West Seattle sweep illustrates the futility of sweeps https://lowdimension.net/sheriffs-office-audit-reveals-racial-disparities-parking-officers-want-access-to-the-crime-database-west-seattle-sweep-illustrates-the-futility-of-sweeps/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 00:34:01 +0000 https://lowdimension.net/sheriffs-office-audit-reveals-racial-disparities-parking-officers-want-access-to-the-crime-database-west-seattle-sweep-illustrates-the-futility-of-sweeps/ 1. A new audit of the King County Sheriff’s Office found significant racial disparities in use of force, arrests and who becomes a ‘suspect’ in areas where the sheriff’s office is the primary enforcement agency of the law. Residents and sheriff’s deputies “flagged black people as suspects, and officers arrested black people at rates nearly […]]]>

1. A new audit of the King County Sheriff’s Office found significant racial disparities in use of force, arrests and who becomes a ‘suspect’ in areas where the sheriff’s office is the primary enforcement agency of the law.

Residents and sheriff’s deputies “flagged black people as suspects, and officers arrested black people at rates nearly four times higher than expected given their proportion of the county’s population,” according to the report. audit.

Although county use-of-force data is limited — 619 calls resulted in a use-of-force between 2019 and 2021 — the audit found that “overall, white officers as a group used force twice as often as black or Asian officers. Additionally, blacks and Hispanics were subjected to use of force more often than whites. »

As the graph above shows, there were also significant disparities in arrests – in particular, black people were three and a half times more likely to be arrested than their proportion of the population would predict. In some areas, such as Sammamish and Woodinville, black people were arrested at a rate more than ten times disproportionate to their population.

After “monitoring” overall arrest rates between different racial groups, that gap more or less disappears, but it still illustrates major upstream disparities, senior management auditor Peter Heineccius told King County Council on Tuesday: Blacks, Browns, and Native Americans are much more likely than whites and Asians to become suspects (in part because people call the police more), and more likely to be arrested following a 911 call.

“It shows the risk that an analysis that controls for certain factors could explain racial disparities because it removes the analysis of how [people of] different races become suspects,” he said.

Another factor that makes it difficult to grasp the extent of racial disparities in stops and detentions: the sheriff’s office does not collect information about race during the vast majority of encounters with the public. According to the interpretation of the Ministry of a law intended to protect immigrants from ICE, the county council should change county law to allow officers to begin routinely recording the race of people they encounter.

“Previous Sheriff’s Office leadership also said officers should not collect information about race, which limits the ability to quantify and ultimately reduce racial disparities,” the audit said.

Calling Tuesday’s council meeting, County Sheriff Patti Cole-Tindall said she “was heartened to see that even though the report indicated there were racial disparities, the amount of force we use, depending on the number of contracts was very, very minimal” – about 0.06% of all service calls are successful, according to the audit.

2. The city’s decision to refund approximately $5 million in parking fines and waive the equivalent of an additional $5 million in tickets isn’t the only issue parking officers have raised as they transition from Seattle Police Department to Seattle Department of Transportation. Parking attendants, who are considered “special police officers” by the SPD commission that was at the center of the parking ticket problem, want to retain access to the Criminal Justice Information System, a system that allows police to check the background of vehicle owners, by radio, before stopping.

Now, the union that represents parking enforcement officers, the Seattle Parking Enforcement Officers Guild (SPEOG), has filed an unfair labor practice lawsuit against the city for stripping them of access to CJIS without negotiating changes with the union. The CJIS is only accessible to law enforcement officers; the State’s Public Employment Relations Commission is currently reviewing their application.

“We still have access to the radio, it’s just that the information is not the same as when we were in the SPD,” said SPEOG chairwoman Chrisanne Sapp. “We’re able to read between the lines, but with all the work we do, I don’t find reading between the lines an acceptable response.”

PERC hearings are not public; however, city officials have argued that parking enforcement officers can still call out plates and know whether to avoid a parked vehicle, even without access to the information system.

2. The recent removal of a small camp of a park near the West Seattle golf course illustrates the problem with the city’s approach to mopping up, according to Keith Hughes, a neighbor who runs a day center in the nearby American Legion Hall: Homeless or meaningful services, people just keep coming back.

The five people who lived at Totem Pole Park a week ago returned to the area within three days, according to Hughes, including a couple who temporarily moved their tent to another location and three single men who stayed a few nights in a large shelter downtown. and returned to West Seattle a few days after leaving. One of the men later physically attacked Hughes, he said, punching the 74-year-old in the face and leaving him with a droopy eye, a large cut and bruises on his left shoulder.

“These guys aren’t mentally stable — the reason they’re in West Seattle in the first place is they don’t handle crowds well,” Hughes said. “And so the city picks them up in their sweeps and takes them downtown to a shelter for 100 people. … It’s pure fantasy when the city says it’s giving people a better temporary housing situation – no they don’t, they offer them a bed in a shelter as long as they stay there quietly and don’t bother anyone.

According to the city’s Department of Social Services, Team HOPE, which does outreach and offers shelter referrals to people living in encampments the city is about to sweep, “began engaging these sites on May 26 and visited several days before the withdrawal, providing shelter and connections to services. The spokesperson confirmed that the city made three referrals to shelters on the day the encampment was swept away.

Hughes said the other two men who returned to West Seattle are now sleeping under the VFW lobby awning after losing their tents and other belongings in the sweep. A spokeswoman for the Parks Department, which is in charge of encampment moves, said the department did not store anyone’s belongings from the encampment.

Hughes has called police about the man who assaulted him, but said in an email that he expects ‘nothing will be done to get him off the streets or any help for his mental state”.

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‘Credit to healthcare’ as Kerala leads with 42% stroke claims under Ayushman Bharat in 2019-21 https://lowdimension.net/credit-to-healthcare-as-kerala-leads-with-42-stroke-claims-under-ayushman-bharat-in-2019-21/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 01:30:47 +0000 https://lowdimension.net/credit-to-healthcare-as-kerala-leads-with-42-stroke-claims-under-ayushman-bharat-in-2019-21/ New Delhi: Kerala accounted for over 40% of all insurance claims made for stroke treatment under the Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (PM-JAY) between August 2019 and March 2021, according to an analysis by the National Health Authority (NHA). Doctors in Kerala say the figure could be attributed to the state’s higher life expectancy – […]]]>

New Delhi: Kerala accounted for over 40% of all insurance claims made for stroke treatment under the Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (PM-JAY) between August 2019 and March 2021, according to an analysis by the National Health Authority (NHA).

Doctors in Kerala say the figure could be attributed to the state’s higher life expectancy – the prevalence of stroke increases with age – and access to healthcare, as well as increased awareness of stroke and acceptance of modern medicine by the population.

As many as 16,179 patients from nine states and two union territories (UTs) were treated for strokes at 536 private healthcare facilities and 299 public healthcare facilities from August 2019 to March 2021, according to the NHA analysis.

Kerala reported the maximum number of claims for stroke packages (42%), followed by Madhya Pradesh (13%), Chhattisgarh and Punjab (11% each), Uttarakhand (10%) and India. Uttar Pradesh (6%).

The analysis is a collaboration between the NHA, which governs PM-JAY, the National Center for Disease Informatics and Research (NCDIR) and the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR).

When a person has a stroke, the blood and oxygen supply to part of the brain is cut off. This happens if there is a blockage in one of the blood vessels (ischemic stroke) or when a vessel bursts in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke).

Dr. Rajeev Jayadevan, Vice President of Research Cell of Indian Medical Association (IMA) Kerala Chapter, said the prevalence of strokes is increasing with the years. Since life expectancy is higher in Kerala, he added, cases are relatively higher in the state.

Diabetes and hypertension – two known risk factors for stroke – are known to have a higher incidence in Kerala.

According to data from National Family Health Survey-530.9% of women and 32.8% of men over the age of 15 suffer from high blood pressure or take medication for high blood pressure.

For diabetes, the corresponding figures are 24.8% and 27% respectively. The averages for all India for women and men are 21.3% and 24% for hypertension, and 13.5% and 15.6% for diabetes.

The NHA analysis found that “the highest proportion of recipients was in the age group 60-74 (38%), followed by 45-59 (29.8%). stroke registries) in India”.

“The average age of strokes ranged from 58 to 67 years in different population-based studies in India. In the 11 states/UTs, the average age ranged from 44 in Chhattisgarh to 64 in Kerala. Stroke in young people (proportion of stroke in < or less than 45 years) was 18.9%, compared to studies in India with a range of 4-20%. Data from the population-based registry in India showed that 11% of stroke registrations were in the age group of 18-44 years.

However, since PM-JAY beneficiaries are limited to particular socio-economic strata (in line with gaps identified in the socio-economic and caste census), and because applications submitted will also be based on the availability of services medical, the data in itself cannot be extrapolated to assess the incidence of strokes in India.

Under PM-JAY, which is the tertiary healthcare arm of Ayushman Bharat, annual medical coverage of Rs 5 lakh is provided to eligible families.


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Longevity, Awareness and Access to Health Care

Dr. Rajeev Jayadevan of the IMA Kerala Chapter said the stroke data is consistent with the fact that life expectancy in Kerala is higher than the national average.

“Kerala has higher longevity and, perhaps depending on that, more people living with non-communicable diseases. Strokes are more common with each decade of life. It is also a fact that access to health care in Kerala is better from the ground up, so it is a well oiled machine,” he said, adding that the public health infrastructure was very good. , as do private hospitals.

“There is a very high level of awareness. Multiple efforts have made everyday people and grassroots healthcare workers familiar with the basic concepts of stroke care and the importance of getting medical help during the golden hour,” said he declared.

Dr. Vivek Nambiar, a neurologist at Amrita Hospital, Ernakulam, said Kerala has a high number of claims because it has a large number of neurologists and stroke centers, and modern medicine is highly accepted. .

“Kerala is a big city with 8-10 very good stroke centers. There are approximately 300 to 350 neurologists. Also, people have faith in modern medicine,” he said. “Strokes in many parts of the country are mired in superstition. There are some parts where people believe that rubbing pigeon blood on the patient cures strokes. Stroke patients often consult traditional healers. But in Kerala, people go to modern centers and get treatment.

Incidence of Stroke in India

A “disability adjusted life year” (DALY), as defined by the World Health Organization, represents the loss of the equivalent of one year of full health. Strokes are among the top 10 causes of DALYs, according to the study. Its rate is highest in eastern (West Bengal, Odisha) and northeastern (Assam, Tripura) and central (Chhattisgarh) states.

“The data of The National Stroke Registry Program has shown that the crude incidence of strokes in India ranged from 96.6 to 187.6 for the lakh population in the population registers of Cachar, Kota, Varanasi, Tirunelveli and Cachar. These population-level data on the burden of stroke underscore the need for stroke services to reduce stroke disability and mortality,” the report states.

He also mentions that there is a lack of up-to-date data on the availability of stroke services. In 2012, there were 100 centers providing anti-clot services and 35 stroke units with resources for comprehensive stroke management.

Data from 2018-2019 shows that the use of stroke imaging in registered cases ranged from 72% in Cachar district of Assam to over 80% in Cuttack, Tirunelveli, Kota and Varanasi.

“Structured data on imaging stroke diagnosis with CT or MRI details of imaging and confirmation of stroke type were not available,” the report adds.

Public hospitals on the front line

Public hospitals shouldered almost all of the burden stroke care in Kerala (81%), Chhattisgarh (91%), Jammu and Kashmir (94%), Bihar (85.4%) and Dadra (100%). Licensed private hospitals provided the majority of services in Punjab (75%), Uttarakhand (82%) and Haryana (74%), according to the analysis.

Of the beneficiaries, 61% were men and 39% women. “With increasing age, the proportion of beneficiaries increased, and the maximum proportion was observed in the age group of 60-74 years for both men and women. The proportion of women aged 60-74 and 75+ was higher than that of men in these age groups,” the analysis found.

The middle age ranged from 42 (Chhattisgarh) to 63.2 (J&K) in men, and from 49 (Chhattisgarh) to 66.3 (Kerala) in women.

(Editing by Tony Rai)


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]]> Where can I find a great travel jacket? https://lowdimension.net/where-can-i-find-a-great-travel-jacket/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 21:00:02 +0000 https://lowdimension.net/where-can-i-find-a-great-travel-jacket/ I travel quite often, and now that things have started up again, I’m looking for a lightweight jacket to wear. I want something that makes me feel better than a sweater, but not as tight and dressy as I would in a blazer. It shouldn’t wrinkle easily and should have pockets. Does such a garment […]]]>

Not only does such a garment exist, but it even has a special name: a jacket! Like many newly relevant sartorial inventions (the megging, the jort), it is a hybrid garment (shirt plus jacket) well suited to meet contemporary needs.

Specifically, it has to pass through an air-conditioned airport during the very hot months, not be crushed by being crammed into a tiny seat for many hours, and then emerge ready for public viewing at the other end. Although it works equally well for trips from home to the grocery store for a morning milk run, or from home to the office for a daily commute.

It’s a more sophisticated alternative to the sweatshirt, without sacrificing ease. And it works perfectly well on sweatshirts, leggings and yoga pants, meaning you can have your comfy clothes stretchy and look a little cooler too. It is also a gender-neutral garment, which is equally popular among men and women.

Truth be told, the shirt is not, in fact, a new invention. It has its roots in late 19th century French workwear, in particular the bleu de travail, a blue shirt worn by workers to protect their day clothes. (Another name for the garment is the chore coat.) Later it was adopted by the U.S. Army, which issued CPO jackets to first petty officers in the 1930s. From there it made its way to Army-Navy surplus stores and therefore in all our wardrobes.

Its characteristics are oversized proportions, best worn over a t-shirt, turtleneck, vest or similar underlayer; large patch pockets; and snaps or button closures. You can, of course, find military and versions of work clothes of the jacket, but you can also find iterations in technical fabric, linen, silk – almost any material and personal aesthetic you could want.

Zara, for example, offers shortened linen versions as well as a satin crinkle effect with a drawstring at the waist. Everlane has a box cotton jacket with additional side pockets at the hips as well as patch pockets, just like Madewell.

And for something with a bit more zip, check out the prints at the Kit, a Daniel Vosovic commissioned brand, a “Project Runway” and CFDA Fashion Incubator alumnus. Wear them and fly away.

Every week on Open Thread, Vanessa will answer a reader’s fashion question, which you can send her anytime via E-mail Where Twitter. Questions are edited and condensed.

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The critique of the hostage crisis –– thrilling and extremely powerful https://lowdimension.net/the-critique-of-the-hostage-crisis-thrilling-and-extremely-powerful/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 06:47:02 +0000 https://lowdimension.net/the-critique-of-the-hostage-crisis-thrilling-and-extremely-powerful/ Summary Gladbeck: the hostage crisis is extremely powerful and raw. Volker Heise’s documentary exposes our appetite for flirting with the viewer’s own moral ambiguity that remains unchanged. The Netflix documentary Gladbeck: The Hostage Crisis was released on the streaming service on June 9, 2022. I was surprised by Netflix’s latest crime documentary, Gladbeck: The Hostage […]]]>

Summary

Gladbeck: the hostage crisis is extremely powerful and raw. Volker Heise’s documentary exposes our appetite for flirting with the viewer’s own moral ambiguity that remains unchanged.

The Netflix documentary Gladbeck: The Hostage Crisis was released on the streaming service on June 9, 2022.

I was surprised by Netflix’s latest crime documentary, Gladbeck: The Hostage Crisis. Some of the events are jaw-dropping and unfold like a limited TV series that would have you saying out loud, “This would never happen.” Director Volker Heise (Aikamatka Schwarzwaldi in 1902) covers 54 hours of the crisis in just over 90 minutes and the amazing things that are happening. The real criminals, reports, police and hostages are away from the cameras. Then, in the eyebrow-raising hubris scene, the journalists laugh as they stand around Hans-Jürgen Rösner, one of the actual hostage takers. He had the rocks to hold an impromptu press conference in the middle of it all. While holding a gun and his finger on the trigger.

Heise’s documentary is brave enough to strictly use footage, television archives and audio recordings. It makes for a breakneck pace that plays out like a fictional thriller. You won’t find interviews or expert testimony here brimming with intrigue and moral dilemmas, making the result more powerful. Rösner and his partner, Dieter Degowski, share a dangerous mix of overconfidence, excessive ambition and arrogance. They created this mess on live television, and they are the stars. Then you have the journalists ignore the basics to become an actor in the story and to allow oneself to be involved. As the film unfolds, you and I become the continual viewers who find entertainment and wonder what’s next. If only we remembered the words and humanity of Herb Morrison as we came to the end.

Gladbeck: the hostage crisis took place in August 1988 which started in West Germany, became a traveling road show and ended abruptly in the Netherlands. Was it the downfall of the media? Some say it happened between the 1980s and 2000s. You might be right because ethics took precedence over the big story to put on sensational 80s TV. Want me to prove my point? In a scene that still makes me doubt people’s humanity, a reporter puts a recording device in front of a female hostage’s face while Rösner has a gun shoved uncomfortably into her neck. As reporters battle for space and angle to capture the perfect frozen moment in the story.

Gladbeck: the hostage crisis is a thrilling and powerful documentary about ethics, the arrogance of mythical proportions and structural incompetence. It was an important moment that renewed journalistic ethics. What Heise accomplishes here is to show that little has changed with the viewer’s appetite – for the insatiable, the macabre and like a moth to flame, flirting with our own moral ambiguity is not not just entertainment but in our reality.

What do you think of the Netflix documentary Gladbeck: The Hostage Crisis? Comments below.

You can watch this documentary with a Netflix subscription.

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