Proportions – Low Dimension http://www.lowdimension.net/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 16:11:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.lowdimension.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Proportions – Low Dimension http://www.lowdimension.net/ 32 32 Under-treatment of ACS in women: “it must stop” https://www.lowdimension.net/under-treatment-of-acs-in-women-it-must-stop/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 14:23:03 +0000 https://www.lowdimension.net/under-treatment-of-acs-in-women-it-must-stop/ AUSTRALIAN women with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are less likely than men to receive evidence-based treatment, according to findings described by a leading international expert as “a huge problem for women”. Professor Roxana Mehran, director of the Center for Interventional Cardiovascular Research and Clinical Trials at the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the Mount Sinai School […]]]>

AUSTRALIAN women with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are less likely than men to receive evidence-based treatment, according to findings described by a leading international expert as “a huge problem for women”.

Professor Roxana Mehran, director of the Center for Interventional Cardiovascular Research and Clinical Trials at the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, said Overview+ in an exclusive podcast that the under-treatment of women in this area was largely due to a lack of data and the participation of women in clinical trials.

“The disparities continue to exist, despite all of our education,” she said.

“We are finding that the prevalence of acute myocardial infarction is increasing rather than decreasing, especially in women over 45 years old. We find that recurrent myocardial infarctions and recurrent events are higher in women than in men.

“We are seeing an increase in myocardial infarctions in young women, or admissions in younger women with acute coronary syndrome, and we know that women present differently, that they have different triggers, that their lesions and their vessels are very different from those of men. “

Professor Mehran co-authored an editorial, published in the MJA, in response to research of Bachelet and his colleagues, detailing the gender disparities in the management of non-ST segment elevation ACS between men and women in Australian hospitals.

Professor Clara Chow, cardiologist at Westmead Hospital and co-author of the research, said InSight + that these gender disparities were “no small thing” without “one simple solution”.

Professor Chow and colleagues analyzed data from the Cooperative National Registry of Acute Coronary Care, Guideline Adherence and Clinical Events (CONCORDANCE) for patients diagnosed with non-ST segment elevation ACS (NSTEACS) in 43 Australian hospitals as of 23 February 2009 to October 16, 2018. They sought to receive guideline-based medications and invasive therapies, including cardiac catheterization and revascularization, with procedures and results at 6-month follow-up assessed by telephone interview.

“The proportion of women who underwent cardiac catheterization was lower (1710, 71% v 4134, 77%), and the median time to catheterization was longer (53 h v 47h); non-obstructive coronary artery disease was detected in a greater proportion of women than men during catheterization (602, 35% v 566, 14%) ”, reported Bachelet and colleagues.

“At discharge, fewer women were prescribed aspirin (85% v 91%), a second antiplatelet drug (59% v 68%), -blockers (71% v 75%) or statins (86% v 92%), or referred for cardiac rehabilitation (54% v 63%).

“Lower proportions of women with coronary artery disease than men have undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (110, 10% v 563, 16%) or were prescribed statins on discharge (94% v 96%). Fewer women than men were referred for cardiac rehabilitation (750, 69% v 2652, 75%), including among those who had been revascularized.

Professor Chow said InSight + than in women, the non-obstructive coronary artery disease underlying their NSTEACS presentation was more common than in men.

“Maybe that’s because there are more common mechanisms in women that haven’t really been detected and differentiated as clearly when we do the diagnostic studies.

“Of course, if you do fewer diagnostic studies in women than in men, that’s a big part of the problem too.”

Professor Chow said the proportion of women participating in clinical trials (20-30%) was “even more out of balance than the actual presentation of this disease.”

Professor Chow said InSight + that communicating and recognizing the differences in how women and men communicate their symptoms was part of the answer.

“I sometimes wonder if it’s in the way of taking clinical history that we don’t account for it properly, in the way we communicate with patients,” she said.

“It often comes down to this communication.

“I’m not saying it’s an excuse. But I’m saying we have to see that people from all walks of life communicate differently, and that probably affects how we diagnose quickly or not.

“One of the things happening here is that there is more delay with the women [getting treated] compared to men, and maybe we have to get through all this complexity of this communication faster to get the answer.

“I often tell my residents that you have to base your decisions on objective benchmarks.

“Yes [the patient has] have high troponin and an abnormal EKG machine, you have had enough [to make a decision]. Whether they tell you that their chest pain is very typical or atypical won’t take the plunge, you have to move on.

Is there unconscious sexism if women are diagnosed with coronary artery disease, but still come home under-treated and under-oriented?

“I hope not,” said Prof Mehran.

“Why wouldn’t you want to refer women to angiography or refer women to coronary revascularization, when we know that in ACS revascularizations save the lives of these patients?

“Why don’t they go home with medical therapy that meets the guidelines?

“Why are they getting fewer statins? Less antiplatelet diets? We will never know the answer to these questions.

“We just have to keep drilling for this to stop. Hope we can equalize it and bring [the numbers] up.”


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Video of a teacher using ratio and proportion to find the past participle of “growing” surfaces online ▷ Ghana news https://www.lowdimension.net/video-of-a-teacher-using-ratio-and-proportion-to-find-the-past-participle-of-growing-surfaces-online-%e2%96%b7-ghana-news/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 20:26:59 +0000 https://www.lowdimension.net/video-of-a-teacher-using-ratio-and-proportion-to-find-the-past-participle-of-growing-surfaces-online-%e2%96%b7-ghana-news/ Video of teacher solving English question with mathematical principles caused a stir online The professor began by indicating that mathematicians solve English problems this way. He used the ratio and the proportion to find the past participle of “stolen” to be “hovered over” A teacher seems to have won over many people after a video […]]]>
  • Video of teacher solving English question with mathematical principles caused a stir online
  • The professor began by indicating that mathematicians solve English problems this way.
  • He used the ratio and the proportion to find the past participle of “stolen” to be “hovered over”

A teacher seems to have won over many people after a video of him using math principles to solve an English question online.

The video seen by YEN.com.gh on the official Onua FM Facebook page, the unidentified teacher used ratio and proportion to find the past participle of the word “stolen” to be “hovered over.”

According to the teacher’s lesson, mathematicians solve their English questions this way.

Video of a teacher using rations and proportions to find the past participle of “grown” surfaces online Source: Onua FM
Source: Facebook

The video has since accumulated more than 7,000 views and nearly 200 reactions from Internet users.

To download YEN’s news app on Google Play now and stay up to date with all major Ghana news

Read also

Internet user: provide at all costs for the woman you love, even if it means taking out a loan; many react massively

YEN.com.gh highlighted some of the interesting comments that were left below the post;

Abraham Murphy commented:

it’s called mathglish

David Fiano replied:

No, the students will cry again because they saw the math in English …

Okine Kwasi wrote:

Correct Formula Can Help Math Education

From Nana Kwaa Mensah:

Hmmmm some people will learn these stupid saaa things after school they wouldn’t even have a job to do mpo

Anakpo David commented:

Africa education and madness are twins

From Theophilus Mensah Azillah:

I can’t stop laughing

Cephas Fianu Fianu commented:

Englishmaths is equal to E.maths by abvietion. E.maths.

From Amenyo Guillaume:

Very good

Bernice Baah responded by saying:

Mathematical and English form

Watch the full video below;

YEN.com.gh reported earlier that a video had surfaced online again and generated a lot of reactions.

In the video seen by YEN.com.gh on an Instagram account called bongoideas, it looks like a college professor is struggling to solve a math question on the blackboard.

Read also

Lecturer gets stuck at blackboard while solving physics question in viral video, students laugh

The lecturer, whose identity has not been disclosed, stood in front of the class, investigating what the problem was.

A lady was seen in the video laughing at what was going on.

Netizens who saw this took to the comments section to share their thoughts on the video.

Source: Yen.com.gh


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Is Masterworks worth it? The platform allows you to buy shares of blue-chip pai https://www.lowdimension.net/is-masterworks-worth-it-the-platform-allows-you-to-buy-shares-of-blue-chip-pai/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 10:00:57 +0000 https://www.lowdimension.net/is-masterworks-worth-it-the-platform-allows-you-to-buy-shares-of-blue-chip-pai/ In the fall of 2018, a Banksy work, “Love is in the Bin,” sold for $ 1.4 million. Now the original buyer has put the work up for sale, and it should bring in more than 5 million dollars – this would be equivalent to a return of more than 250% on the initial investment. […]]]>

In the fall of 2018, a Banksy work, “Love is in the Bin,” sold for $ 1.4 million.

Now the original buyer has put the work up for sale, and it should bring in more than 5 million dollars – this would be equivalent to a return of more than 250% on the initial investment.

What if, instead of the art market being the exclusive preserve of the rich, ordinary people could buy shares of an expensive work of art and sell the shares as they pleased?

This is exactly what a new platform is, Masterpieces, seeks to do.

Art investment funds have been around for over a century. Masterworks, however, has given a new twist to an old practice, in that the platform allows individuals to purchase shares of specific artwork in $ 20 increments. Investors can then sell those shares in an easy-to-use secondary market or wait for Masterworks to sell the coin and receive pro-rata proceeds.

For almost 10 years, I have been teaching a course on economics and the arts with the art historian Nancy Scott. In this course, we spend time discussing the history and profitability of investing in art, both in theory and in practice.

For those who plan to buy art purely for investment purposes, it is important to understand how art investment funds have traditionally worked and whether experts think it is. a good investment.

The French pool their resources

A first investment fund in art was called Bear skin (La Peau de l’Ours), which was based in France at the beginning of the 20th century.

The name comes from a french fable which contains the aphorism “never sell the skin of the bear before you have killed it” – the French equivalent of “do not count your chickens before they hatch” – and it alludes to the fact that t investing in art can be risky business.

Partly conceived as a way to support emerging post-impressionist artists, such as Picasso, Matisse and Gauguin, the fund was run as a syndicate in which a small number of partners each contributed identical amounts to purchase a collection of paintings.

Businessman, art critic and collector André Level managed the fund and organized the sale of paintings. After the sale of the paintings, he received 20% of the sale price For his work. The artists received 20% of the fund’s profits in addition to the money they received from the initial sale. Investors would then receive the rest in equal proportions.

This concept – returning part of the sale price to the artist – is known as the resale right, or artist’s resale right. Versions of this are now the law in most parts of the Western world other than the United States.

This first art fund was a success. It created a demand for new works of art and supported innovative Impressionist and Modern artists, while providing a important return to its original investors.

Nevertheless, there are art funds that are still in operation, such as Anthea and The fine arts group, and, of course, banks and auction houses have long described investing in art as a diversification strategy adapted for the rich.

But what do economists say about art as an investment?

Is this really a “floating shit game”?

Economic theory suggests that by definition investing in art might offer lower returns than investing in stocks. This is because it is considered a passionate investment. Like investing in sports memorabilia, jewelry, or coins, part of the return on investment in art should be the intrinsic enjoyment of the objects themselves. The total return consists of the monetary return and the enjoyment of the property.

Since stocks do not, for most people, offer this enjoyment value, the monetary returns from investing in these financial instruments should, in theory, be greater than the monetary returns from investing in art.

But it is important to really analyze the numbers.

One of the very first articles on the monetary return on investment in art was published in 1986 and written by the late eminent economist William Baumol. The title? “Unnatural investment: or art as a floating shit game”.

Baumol estimated that the long-term inflation-adjusted returns for investing in art, over a 300-year period, were only 0.6%. Some researchers have since estimated higher yields. For example, the work of the Yale finance professor Will goetzmann and economists Jiangping Mei and Mike Moses find inflation-adjusted returns of 2% over 250 years and 4.9% over 125 years, respectively. Estimated returns vary depending on time period, sample and methodology.

In addition, these studies do not include transaction costs, which, when it comes to art, can be substantial, thanks to the large commissions collected by auction houses or private dealers to act as intermediaries. They also do not take into account the selection of samples; paintings that often fall in value cannot be auctioned.

However, both Goetzmann’s and Mei and Moses’ studies find that stock market performance does not appear to correlate with returns on investments in art. It may therefore be beneficial to invest in art as a way to diversify your portfolio.

Art for all?

Masterworks, however, is a bit different from the traditional art funds discussed above. Investors buy shares of a single work of art, rather than investing in a fund that includes multiple works. The entry price is much lower, and as long as there are willing buyers for the artwork, investors are not stuck in the fund for a period of time. Investors can earn a return simply by selling stocks that increase in value, without waiting for the artwork itself to be sold.

But like traditional art funds, investors in art stocks sold by Masterworks will earn money if the price of their artwork goes up, and lose their money if it goes down.

In the end, Masterworks seems innovative and fun. The format will likely appeal to a younger generation of investors, many of whom may have started investing small amounts via applications such as Robin Hood. The site is easy to navigate and could provide some enjoyment – even I have been tempted to attempt to buy stocks.

But should we hope to become rich by investing in art? Probably not.

Plus, unlike Skin of the Bear, it doesn’t necessarily benefit emerging artists. Masterworks focuses on works established with professional experience, by artists such as Banksy, Andy warhol and Claude Monet, to only cite a few.

That being said, Masterworks could get a mass audience to invest in art. But, emptor caution: art is a risky investment.


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No intensive care beds available in southern Illinois amid increase in COVID hospitalizations – NBC Chicago https://www.lowdimension.net/no-intensive-care-beds-available-in-southern-illinois-amid-increase-in-covid-hospitalizations-nbc-chicago/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 21:06:01 +0000 https://www.lowdimension.net/no-intensive-care-beds-available-in-southern-illinois-amid-increase-in-covid-hospitalizations-nbc-chicago/ For at least the second time this week, one of Illinois’ health care regions reported no intensive care unit beds available, an issue that prompted an advocacy group doctors called it a “public health emergency of epic proportions.” According to updated statistics from the Illinois Department of Public Health, Region 5, made up of 20 […]]]>

For at least the second time this week, one of Illinois’ health care regions reported no intensive care unit beds available, an issue that prompted an advocacy group doctors called it a “public health emergency of epic proportions.”

According to updated statistics from the Illinois Department of Public Health, Region 5, made up of 20 counties in the southern tip of the state, had none of its 94 intensive care beds available for admission. at 11:59 p.m. Thursday.

The region has seen its ICU bed availability remain below 10% for more than a month, and hospitalizations have continued to remain high even after a steady uptrend in those numbers began to decline in early September. .

Prior to that, hospitalizations had increased significantly in August, peaking at 164 on September 1. On Thursday, that number dropped slightly to 153, but remains well above what it was during the descent of hospitalizations that occurred after the COVID vaccine. became more widely available in the spring.

In a tweet, the Illinois Healthcare Professionals Collaborative Action Team (IMPACT) called the lack of available critical care beds in the region a “public health emergency of epic proportions,” explaining that people can help turn the situation around by getting vaccinated and wearing a mask.

The positivity rate has also remained steadily high in Region 5, exceeding 10% since mid-August. The number continues to be the highest in the state, reaching 10.2% on Tuesday.

Availability of intensive care beds has been a problem statewide during a recent increase in COVID cases, with the state’s 11 health care regions reporting less than 25% availability of care beds intensive.

A total of 502 COVID patients are currently in intensive care units across the state, occupying about 18% of the state’s intensive care beds, according to data from the IDPH. Of these patients, 275 are on ventilators as of Thursday evening.

Overall, hospitalizations are down statewide, with 2,082 patients currently hospitalized for COVID. This is a drop of more than 200 from the 2,346 hospitalized on September 9, showing that hospitalizations could level off amid the pandemic.


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Two-fifths of companies plan to take fewer business trips after pandemic https://www.lowdimension.net/two-fifths-of-companies-plan-to-take-fewer-business-trips-after-pandemic/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 08:37:47 +0000 https://www.lowdimension.net/two-fifths-of-companies-plan-to-take-fewer-business-trips-after-pandemic/ The proportion of employees traveling for business is expected to remain broadly the same after the pandemic *, suggests a new study from the Ministry of Transport (DfT). Companies expect an average of 38% of employees to travel for business, up from 40% before the pandemic. Only 1% of companies surveyed by Ipsos Mori said […]]]>

The proportion of employees traveling for business is expected to remain broadly the same after the pandemic *, suggests a new study from the Ministry of Transport (DfT).

Companies expect an average of 38% of employees to travel for business, up from 40% before the pandemic. Only 1% of companies surveyed by Ipsos Mori said that no employee would come for face-to-face meetings.

Data from the DfT, however, suggests that the frequency of face-to-face meetings should decrease as virtual meetings will continue to be used in the future.

Two-fifths (41%) of companies said they expected to take fewer business trips than before the pandemic (27% a little less, 14% a lot less) and more than a quarter (27%) s ‘expect to take more business trips (19)% a little more, 8% a lot more).

Almost a third (30%) said they expected to make the same number of business trips.

Most companies predicted that among their employees, most would travel at least once a month – but the proportion saying so rose from three-quarters (76%) before the pandemic to two-thirds (65%) after the pandemic, a third (35%) predicting most employees would travel less than once a month.

Fewer expected their employees to travel at least once a week, going from two-fifths (40%) before the pandemic to one-third (34%) after.

The largest reductions in weekly travel were expected among midsize businesses – nearly half (49%) said their staff traveled at least once a week before the pandemic.

This percentage is estimated to drop to 39% after the pandemic, and for businesses in Wales / Scotland / Northern Ireland from 74% to 38%.

The largest reductions in monthly travel were also expected among midsize companies, from 87% to 67%, while DfT data for large companies suggested a drop from 83% to 68%.

INCREASING CAR DEPENDENCE

According to the DfT survey, more and more use is made of company cars and gray fleet vehicles.

Before the pandemic, the car was the most widely used primary form of transportation for domestic business travel.

Almost one in three (29%) business trips were made by car, followed by long-distance train (15%), local trains (14%), national airlines (14%), buses local (6%), taxi (4%) and other modes, including cycling / walking (3%).

During the pandemic, the use of the car as the main mode of business travel increased significantly from 29% to 43%, while the use of shared transport decreased, according to the DfT survey.

The use of long-distance and intercity train services as the primary mode has declined significantly from 15% before the pandemic to 8% during the pandemic.

The use of domestic air services has also declined significantly, from 14% before the pandemic to 9% during the pandemic.

The findings echo those of the OC&C speedometer’s “Battery Late Than Never” report, released earlier this year, which suggested the pandemic had helped to reinforce the importance of a car, despite people driving. less.

More than two in five drivers (42%), according to the OC&C speedometer report, said the pandemic has heightened their belief that a car is essential, amid fears about shared transportation and the transmission of Covid- 19.

Assuming the restrictions are no longer in place, companies told the DfT survey that they expected to use a mix of primary modes similar to pre-pandemic, with a return to long-haul rail and domestic air travel, and a reduction in the proportion of car trips to levels during the pandemic.

Companies said they expect an average of 33% of trips to use the car as their primary mode of transportation, up from 29% before the pandemic.

Nearly one in eight (13%) said they would choose to use long-distance rail as their primary mode up from 15% before the pandemic, and 11% would use domestic airlines, up from 14% before the Covid strike -19.

As for other modes, companies expect an average of 10% of journeys to be made by local trains compared to 14% before the pandemic and 11% during the pandemic.

The survey suggests that 7% will use local buses, up from 6% before the pandemic and 4% during, and 5% will use taxis, which is an increase from 3% before the pandemic and 5% during.

Other modes, including cycling and walking, are expected to account for 3% of business trips, which is identical to the proportion observed before the pandemic and down from the 5% observed during Covid-19.

* Post-pandemic was defined in the investigation as “when Covid-19 is controlled to the point where all restrictions on businesses and the public have been lifted”.


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Himachal Pradesh rules the country, as vax pace maintains momentum | Latest India News https://www.lowdimension.net/himachal-pradesh-rules-the-country-as-vax-pace-maintains-momentum-latest-india-news/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 21:13:52 +0000 https://www.lowdimension.net/himachal-pradesh-rules-the-country-as-vax-pace-maintains-momentum-latest-india-news/ On September 16, India’s major vaccination campaign ended for eight months. Until Thursday evening, the country has administered more than 771 million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine, with six in 10 adults (61.9%) in the country having received at least one vaccine, and just over two in 10 (20.2%) having been fully vaccinated. Three states […]]]>

On September 16, India’s major vaccination campaign ended for eight months. Until Thursday evening, the country has administered more than 771 million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine, with six in 10 adults (61.9%) in the country having received at least one vaccine, and just over two in 10 (20.2%) having been fully vaccinated.

Three states (Himachal Pradesh, Sikkim and Goa) and four Union territories (Ladakh, Lakshadweep, Chandigarh and Dadra and Nagar Haveli and Daman and Diu) announced during the last two weeks that they had administered the first doses to the whole of their population.

A look at the performance of different states and the way forward for the country’s vaccination campaign.

1. National vaccination rolls back peaks, but pace remains high

India’s vaccination rate, which has been extremely uneven in the past, is now going through one of its best phases. Over the past week, an average of 7 million daily doses were administered each day across the country, according to HT’s Covid-19 dashboard. Although this is a decrease from the peak vaccination rate (for the week ended September 1, the seven-day average of daily doses peaked at 8.5 million doses), it is is still better than anything seen until the end of August. One concern is that over the past week that number has been steadily declining.

Over the past week, an average of 7 million daily doses were administered each day across the country, according to HT’s Covid-19 dashboard.

2. Himachal Pradesh leads in all areas, with Kerala and Uttarakhand not far behind

Himachal Pradesh, which was the first Indian state to cover its entire adult population with single doses on August 29, continues to lead the country in terms of key immunization measures – population covered with at least one dose and proportion of fully vaccinated adults. About 63.7% of all adults in the state are partially vaccinated, while 37.8% are fully vaccinated. This translates to almost 100% of the state’s estimated adult population (according to the National Population Census Commission of India) having received at least one dose. Admittedly, coverage appears to exceed 100% as adult population figures are projected estimates and may be slightly off in some areas.

Uttarakhand is in second place with almost 57.1% of adults in the state partially vaccinated and 31.1% having received both doses of the vaccine - which translates to about 88.2% of adults receiving at least a vaccine.
Uttarakhand is in second place with almost 57.1% of adults in the state partially vaccinated and 31.1% having received both doses of the vaccine – which translates to about 88.2% of adults receiving at least a vaccine.

In terms of overall coverage, Uttarakhand ranks second with nearly 57.1% of adults in the state partially vaccinated and 31.1% having received both doses of the vaccine, or about 88.2% of adults receiving at least one vaccine. Kerala, with 87.2% of adults receiving injections, has the third highest overall population coverage among states for which adult population projections were available. Interestingly, the state ranks second after Himachal Pradesh in the proportion of fully vaccinated adults – 35.4%. The southern state’s figures are important, especially because it has been a hot spot in recent months, accounting for over 60% of the country’s total daily cases on some days. However, the seven-day average of new infections in the state has steadily declined over the past 10 days.

Gujarat, another large state, has covered 79.2% of its adults with at least a single dose and 30% are fully immunized. With 78% of adults having been trapped, Madhya Pradesh ends the country’s Top 5 in terms of overall coverage. The state, however, lags behind the national average in second-dose coverage (only 19.2% of adult parliamentarians are fully immunized), the data shows. True, disaggregated population projections are not available for northeastern states other than Assam, so they have been grouped under one category – “Northeast excluding Assam”. This group is slightly above the national average in terms of overall coverage (64.6%), but ranks among the best regions of the country in proportion to the fully immunized population (27.7%).

At the other end of the spectrum, West Bengal has the lowest proportion of adults covered by a single dose in the country at 47.7%. It is followed by Jharkhand (49.3%), Uttar Pradesh (50.9%), Bihar (51.8%) and Telangana (53%), rounding off the bottom five. When the proportion of people fully vaccinated is taken into account, West Bengal (19.5% of adults who received both vaccines) comes out of the bottom five. Uttar Pradesh (10.5% of fully vaccinated adults) is the lowest in the country, followed by Bihar (11.3%), Jharkhand (13.4%), Tamil Nadu (14.6%) and Assam (16.8%).

3. States still maintain an impressive pace

Another key statistic to watch is the state-level vaccination rate. For this too, the daily dose administration data is compared to the population of a region to give the varying population states a common basis for comparison. This is a particularly interesting statistic to map for regions that have high overall coverage, because if there is reluctance to immunize among certain sections of the population, it should be reflected here as a decrease in the number. .

This analysis shows that Kerala in particular, and Uttarakhand to some extent, are states where the pace continues to be high despite a high proportion of adults already bitten.
This analysis shows that Kerala in particular, and Uttarakhand to some extent, are states where the pace continues to be high despite a high proportion of adults already bitten.

Over the past month, among India’s 10 states with the best overall coverage, Kerala is again performing well – on average, the state (despite having the third highest overall coverage) administered 9,861 doses per million daily of adults, the highest in India. In second place is Haryana (10th highest overall coverage) with 9,736 new doses administered per million adults per day. It is followed by Madhya Pradesh (fifth highest coverage; 9,144 doses per million) and Uttarakhand (third place overall, 9,086 doses).

This analysis shows that Kerala in particular, and Uttarakhand to some extent, are states where the pace continues to be high despite a high proportion of adults already bitten. For context, Himachal Pradesh is in last place in this metric (6,320 daily doses per million over the past month), but that is to be expected as the state is only giving second shots.

4. What is needed to cover all adults by the end of December

While the pace of the campaign has improved, especially compared to the low rates seen in previous months, data shows there is still room for progress if India is to meet its stated target of vaccinate its entire adult population of 940 million by the end of 2021, a pledge the government made in a submission to the Supreme Court. In total, India was to administer around 1.88 billion doses by the end of the year to meet this target. Since 765 million of these have already been administered, that leaves approximately 1.115 billion doses to be administered in the remaining 107 days of the year, or 10.4 million doses each day until December 31. ) this rate demanded a few days, he could not do it daily.


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NEET led to fewer Tamil and economically weaker students entering medical school: TN Panel https://www.lowdimension.net/neet-led-to-fewer-tamil-and-economically-weaker-students-entering-medical-school-tn-panel/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 05:19:57 +0000 https://www.lowdimension.net/neet-led-to-fewer-tamil-and-economically-weaker-students-entering-medical-school-tn-panel/ New Delhi: A committee appointed by the government of Tamil Nadu has found that students in rural areas, economically poorer backgrounds, Tamil schools, and state council-affiliated schools are less likely to pass the National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET ). According to Indian Express, the proportion of these students in state medical schools has declined […]]]>

New Delhi: A committee appointed by the government of Tamil Nadu has found that students in rural areas, economically poorer backgrounds, Tamil schools, and state council-affiliated schools are less likely to pass the National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET ). According to Indian Express, the proportion of these students in state medical schools has declined significantly since the introduction of NEET in 2017-18, according to the panel.

In the last week alone, three students committed suicide in Tamil Nadu, allegedly because of the pressure they were under from NEET.

Tamil Nadu passed a bill on Monday that attempts to bypass NEETs and instead allows medical admissions to state colleges on the basis of grades obtained in class XII or above two.

Introducing the bill to admit Tamil Nadu to undergraduate medical courses to the assembly, Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu MP Stalin said the law would “write the history of social justice “. The DMK government in June formed a high-level committee headed by retired Madras High Court judge AK Rajan to study the impact of NEETs. The committee’s report was staunchly against NEET.

This bill, according to the Indian Express, was based on the committee report. The panel found that the proportion of rural students in medical schools increased from an average of 61.45% (pre-NEET) to 50.81% (post-NEET).

Public school students struggled to enter medical schools even before the introduction of the NEET, but the nine-member committee found that their proportion fell further after the introduction of the exam – from 1. 12% to 0.06%.

Meanwhile, the share of students from an English-speaking school increased from 85.12% before to 98.01% after NEET.

The proportion of students whose parents earned less than Rs 2.5 lakh per year also decreased, from 47.42% in 2016-17 to 41.05% in 2020-2021, Indian Express reported.

NEET has been a politically sensitive issue in the state for many years. The suicide death of Anita, a 17-year-old girl from a Dalit family, in 2017 sparked widespread protests across the state. She had achieved high marks in Class XII, but was unable to clear NEET.


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6.5 million children do not go to school in Sindh https://www.lowdimension.net/6-5-million-children-do-not-go-to-school-in-sindh/ Sun, 12 Sep 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://www.lowdimension.net/6-5-million-children-do-not-go-to-school-in-sindh/ KARACHI: No less than 6.5 million children in Sindh are out of school, which represents 44% of the province’s total children aged 5 to 16. This was revealed in a recent study titled “The Missing Third – An Out-of-School Study of Pakistani 5-16 Year Olds” conducted by the Pak Alliance for Maths and Science. “The […]]]>

KARACHI: No less than 6.5 million children in Sindh are out of school, which represents 44% of the province’s total children aged 5 to 16.

This was revealed in a recent study titled “The Missing Third – An Out-of-School Study of Pakistani 5-16 Year Olds” conducted by the Pak Alliance for Maths and Science.

“The total population aged 5 to 16 [children] in Sindh is 14,675,864. [And] 44 percent of this population is declared [to be] outside of school. This represents a total of 6,484,007 children unable to attend school in the province, ”says the study. He says that nearly 100 percent of the children of these five-year-olds have never been to school, compared to 63 percent of all of these 16-year-olds. The dropout rate increases steadily with age. It increases sharply between 10 and 11 years old and 14 and 16 years old. Highlighting the reasons for this, the study indicates that education spending is the basic factor why 95 percent of out-of-school children (OOSCs) never attended school. while the reluctance of children is another main reason behind 30 percent of abandoned OOSCs. Likewise, 19 percent do not go to school because they are required to help with work at home and away from home. Of the 29 districts of Sindh, 21 have over 44% OOSC population. The enrollment rate in public schools in Sindh is considerably high, with 21 districts accounting for 70 percent or more of children enrolled in public schools.

In total, 14 of the 29 districts of Sindh were identified in the study as “highly dependent on the state” for education provision. They include Thatta, Kashmore, Tando Muhammad Khan, Sujawal, Badin, Shikarpur, Jacobabad, Tharparkar, Larkana, Mirpurkhas, Kamber-Shahdadkot, Umerkot, Matiari and Shaheed Benazirabad. These districts are home to 3,295,008 OOSCs, which represents 51% of the total OOSC population in Sindh. All six districts of Karachi have more than half of the students enrolled in private schools. Korangi district in Karachi has the highest proportion of children enrolled in private schools at 75 percent.

Meanwhile, more than 80 percent of enrolled students attend public schools in 15 districts of Sindh. The highest proportion of students attending madrasas is found in Tharparkar district with 10 percent, followed by western district of Karachi with 6 percent and eastern district of Karachi with 5 percent.

Citing the latest data released by the Pakistan Bureau of Statistics, the study indicates that 13 out of 29 districts in Sindh have an OOSC rate of over 50 percent. The seven districts with the lowest OOSC rate in Sindh include Hyderabad and the six districts of Karachi. Thatta ranks the worst in terms of the proportion of OOSC, as 71% of children in Thatta district are out of school, while Kashmore ranks second with 63% OOSC. Tando Muhammad Khan has 66 percent OOSC, Sujawal 65 percent and Badin 63 percent.

In Karachi region, Malir district has 38 percent of the OOSC population while western district has 30 percent and Korangi district has 23 percent. In the eastern and southern districts, 22 percent of children do not go to school. Karachi Central District has the smallest OOSC ratio.

“17 districts have more out-of-school girls than boys compared to 11 districts with more out-of-school boys. Karachi Western District has an equal proportion of out-of-school boys and girls. The report says that after Balochistan, Sindh has the second highest proportion of 16-year-olds who have never been to school. This means that Sindh has a large population of young adults who have never been to school.


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Opinion: By working together we can achieve greater equity in our region https://www.lowdimension.net/opinion-by-working-together-we-can-achieve-greater-equity-in-our-region/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 04:02:13 +0000 https://www.lowdimension.net/opinion-by-working-together-we-can-achieve-greater-equity-in-our-region/ Prior to his assumption of the presidency, Abraham Lincoln gave what is often referred to as the “Divided House” speech. This speech was delivered in a tumultuous context: our country wondered whether slavery would be eradicated or normalized across the country. The abolition of slavery prevailed, but the seeds of racism continue to bear fruit […]]]>

Prior to his assumption of the presidency, Abraham Lincoln gave what is often referred to as the “Divided House” speech. This speech was delivered in a tumultuous context: our country wondered whether slavery would be eradicated or normalized across the country. The abolition of slavery prevailed, but the seeds of racism continue to bear fruit in virtually every part of our society today.

Jay williams

A quest to rid our state of the divided house of “Two Connecticuts does not mean that everyone has to live in the same house, drive the same type of car, or earn the same salary. Yet no group of citizens should be systematically excluded from opportunities to prosper because of systemic and structural barriers that are rooted in racism (or classism, sexism and so many other “isms,” for that matter.)

Racism underlies so many inequities and disparities that we see today. These racial and ethnic disparities are so common that many are seen as the acceptable, natural order of society. This couldn’t be further from the truth; in fact, the data in our state indicates a pervasive problem.

  • In Greater Hartford, 32% of black adults and 27% of Latino adults report having negative net worth, compared to 14% of white adults. (Greater Hartford Community Well-Being Index 2019)
  • The proportion of black and Latin residents who are unemployed significantly exceeds that of white residents; while 6% of white residents are unemployed, 12% of Latinxes and 14% of black residents are unemployed.

The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated these disparities:

  • During the pandemic, 24% of all Connecticut residents say they are just doing it or struggling financially. For black residents, that number is 55%.
  • 37% of Latinx residents say at least one resident of their household lost their job during the pandemic, twice the rate of white residents.

The economic impact of systemic and structural racism is staggering: McKinsey & Co. believes that the racial wealth gap “will cost the US economy between $ 1,000 billion and $ 1,500 billion between 2019 and 2028, or 4 to 6% of the GDP forecast in 2028” and by closing the gap, the US GDP could be 4 to 6% higher in 2028.

No organization, community, state or society can fully prosper by systematically excluding large proportions of its participants from equitable opportunities. The loss of creativity, productivity and economic performance is a constant and insurmountable obstacle to the prospects of any entity. We simply cannot compete with so many of our marginalized and sidelined talents.

Yet Connecticut can thrive as a state of diverse lived experiences. We have the wealth and the resources to set an example of what a more equitable state would look like. The question is whether we have the will and the courage to pursue this future.

The Hartford Foundation for Public Giving believes that to be true to our mission of creating a truly vibrant Greater Hartford, we need to be explicit about the root cause of inequitable opportunity – systemic racism – and how it has led to disparities in our region. We must take significant steps to dismantle structural racism and achieve equity in social and economic mobility in Black and Latin communities in Greater Hartford. While it takes a long-term commitment, now is the time to act. We know it won’t be easy, but by working together we can achieve greater equity in our region.

As we approach our 100e Anniversary, and as the state’s largest community foundation, the Hartford Foundation is committed to being a leading voice on this issue. As we embark on our own journey of reflection, learning and aspiration around equity and inclusion, we simultaneously believe that we must use our platform to encourage, inspire and cajole our community. in the broad sense to do the same. We see no alternative; as Abraham Lincoln rebuked our nation over 160 years ago, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.”

Jay Williams is President of the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving. He is a panelist on a series, “The two Connecticuts: conversations about race and location”, Which begins on September 22.

This special four-part series, co-sponsored by the Connecticut Mirror, will examine how segregation affects people of color – robbing them of personal dignity, economic opportunity, and access to health care and safety – but also puts them at a disadvantage. ‘State as a whole. Register and find additional information here. Participation is free and the program is accessible virtually.


CTViewpoints accepts rebuttals or opposing views to this and all of its comments. Read our guidelines and submit your comments here.


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Northshore Pizza Dough Takes Huge Proportions, Passes Dumpster After Ida | Hurricane center https://www.lowdimension.net/northshore-pizza-dough-takes-huge-proportions-passes-dumpster-after-ida-hurricane-center/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 20:25:00 +0000 https://www.lowdimension.net/northshore-pizza-dough-takes-huge-proportions-passes-dumpster-after-ida-hurricane-center/ A mass of pizza dough thrown by a Domino’s Pizza employee tasked with preparing Covington’s pizzeria for Hurricane Ida has grown to huge proportions over the past week. What started out as a drop completely contained by the dumpster rose and exceeded its metallic limits thanks to temperatures that hovered in the 90s. Resident Nicole […]]]>

A mass of pizza dough thrown by a Domino’s Pizza employee tasked with preparing Covington’s pizzeria for Hurricane Ida has grown to huge proportions over the past week.

What started out as a drop completely contained by the dumpster rose and exceeded its metallic limits thanks to temperatures that hovered in the 90s. Resident Nicole Amstutz, who describes herself as a ” Snacktion Reporter, “documented the growth of the blob since Wednesday via social media.

The general manager of Domino’s Pizza did not immediately respond to interview requests.

More than 70 homeless animals housed at the Northshore Humane Society were evacuated on September 2 after Hurricane Ida cut power and cleaned up …

Amstutz’s Facebook post had collected 1,600 shares on Saturday afternoon. “I’m really glad it makes so many people laugh at such a stressful time,” Amstutz commented.

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See the progress of the dough below.






By Wednesday afternoon, the dough had risen considerably.









dough 3 saturday

On Saturday, September 4, the dough had passed the dumpster.









snail and paste

An apple snail gives the impression of scale to the dough.




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